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Syrian refugees living in makeshift camps in the south of Turkey are extremely vulnerable. As most of the camp inhabitants are informally in the country they have no legal right to healthcare, education or work permits. Due to the harsh living conditions, many suffer from malnutrition, severe infections, and chronic diseases. Children are no longer in school and whole families work on the nearby farms to survive. 

Turkey's Informal Refugee Settlements

Ever since the conflict in Syria broke out, there has been a startling increase in the number of Syrian children being pushed out of school and into exploitative forms of work in order to provide for their families.

Little Hands, Heavy Burden - IBTNews Deeply & VICE

Syria remains one of the most dangerous countries in the world. Nearly half of the population has been internally displaced or has fled to other countries and the war has claimed the lives of close to half a million people. Over the past six years, Syrians have devised countless ways to escape the killing and violence.

From Syria to Jordan - IOM
Ramadan at the Farm - Your Middle East

Abu Khalid, 47, his two wives, five sons and six daughters and two grandchildren fled from Idlib, Syria in 2012 and now live and work at a farm in Irbid, Jordan. The family farm every day and receive a small income as well as vegetables to sustain themselves. With the farm far from a nearby school, the children no longer attend school but instead work. The whole family works from early morning to dust. 

The Secret Gardens of Za'atari Camp - Al Jazeera & The Huffington Post

In the midst of an expanse of dry land, thousands of Syrian refugees have been living in Zaatari Camp, Jordan. Some have turned to gardening to help them adapt to life in the camp and bring a bit of greenery to the desert landscape that has become their home.